End of an Era Fireworks Display

A Ford GT and a Lamborghini Countach LPI 800-4. What at first seems to us like an odd couple turns out to be a surprisingly good match. How did we come to that conclusion? The cars’ owner explained it to us.

  • Text
    Michael Köckritz
  • Photos
    Matthias Mederer · ramp.pictures
What a Ford GT and a Lamborghini Countach LPI 800-4 have in common? The first answer is: Both are modern interpretations of an iconic design, and both have made history. (Okay, so the Countach may not have made motorsport history, but it is a legend in automotive design and an important part of our shared cultural heritage.) The second answer is: They’re both owned by the same person, though he shall remain nameless here. Anyway, we spoke to him about the parallels and differences between the two cars, and about his daughters, who have very clear opinions about each of them. In between, we also heard about a very special journey in the Countach from Sant’Agata Bolognese to Germany that included some surprising encounters with the law.
The Countach has played a key role in defining Lamborghini design: scissor doors, V12, low wedge profile. What role will the new model play?

The new Countach, along with the Aventador Ultimae, represents the end of an era for Lamborghini’s naturally aspirated twelve-cylinder engine. The new engine has been mildly hybridized, but you shouldn’t pay too much thought to that. All future Lamborghinis will probably be full hybrids. At Ford, the V8 era came to an end with this GT. The new GT will be powered by a turbocharged V6. I mean, what’s the point of that? And it doesn’t sound all that great either.

Both are real driving machines.

They really are fun to drive. There’s one important difference, however: The Ford GT was produced in the ’00s and is one of the last real men’s cars. It shows no mercy. There’s ABS, but that’s about it. Other than that, you have to fly by the seat of your pants. That’s what this car is like. The power doesn’t really announce itself, and when it does come, you usually have a lot of trouble keeping up. The Countach is different, with all its ultra-modern driving aids, although in the end it always comes down to taking the laws of physics seriously. If you overdo it, you can kiss your ass goodbye here too. In other words, both stand for enormous driving enjoyment – albeit in different forms.

"The Countach is different, with all its ultra-modern driving aids, although in the end it always comes down to taking the laws of physics seriously. If you overdo it, you can kiss your ass goodbye here too."
How specifically does this difference manifest itself?

The Countach has modern racing brakes. They scare you at first if you’re not used to them. When they’re cold, they don’t really grip. Being naturally aspirated, it has a completely different response; it’s not as strong at first. You wouldn’t think so, because on paper it has almost 300 hp more than the Ford. The two cars weigh almost the same, but still the Countach doesn’t immediately outrun the Ford. The differences only become apparent at about 250 km/h. I should also point out that the Ford produces a torque of 774 Nm. The Countach doesn’t reach that level. Okay, so it gets close. But seen in this light, you could get nasty and say: Better buy five old Ford GTs than one new Countach.

You once owned an original Countach. Does the new one remind you of the old one in any way?

The design unmistakably documents its origins. Lamborghini found some really nice solutions here, for example at the front. In general, the new Countach includes some very beautiful, coherent references. The whole thing was skillfully built on top of the Aventador platform.

There have also been critical voices . . .

That’s true. Some people have even called it a poorly made Aventador. I struggled with myself at first, too, but when I finally saw it for the first time, I said to Mitja Borkert, the chief designer, “Mitja, you’ve built a beautiful car.” That’s why I bought it. The Countach is not as visually loud as an Aventador. It’s a finely tailored bespoke Italian suit. Of course, the car is way too expensive. But it is simply beautiful. There are one or two other cars in this price category, but when I look at a Pagani, it just doesn’t do it for me. If you find it appealing, okay. But it’s not my thing.

1/2
"The Ford GT was produced in the ’00s and is one of the last real men’s cars. It shows no mercy. There’s ABS, but that’s about it. Other than that, you have to fly by the seat of your pants. That’s what this car is like"
Is there an advantage to driving the tried-and-tested technology of an Aventador?

Absolutely. Today I even think: Thank God there’s an Aventador under there! Everything works. I know enough people who own low-volume cars, and the technology is not always reliable. The Countach LP 800-4 is a limited edition of 112 units, and you can tell by looking at one or two details of the body when something is off. Though it must be said that they put a lot of effort into it, and the build quality is extremely high.

Does the driving enjoyment compare with an Aventador?

I would say there isn’t much of a difference between an Aventador SVJ and a Countach LP 800. If you’re familiar with an Aventador SVJ, you’ll feel right at home in the Countach.

What about the fact that it’s a hybrid?

It causes the transmission to sometimes pause to think for a moment. There’s a delay of about one tenth of a second, then the gear kicks in so hard that the torque feels as if someone had hit you in the back with a hammer. That’s probably due to the combined torque from the electric motor and the combustion engine. That’s also the most noticeable difference to the Aventador. Otherwise, engine speed to vehicle speed is almost identical. We experienced this first-hand on a drive out in Croatia. There was an Aventador SV with us, and we drove the gears out in sync. It was a symphony. A kind of V12 duet.

That’s Lamborghini for you.

Absolutely. Though if you consider the usual roar of a Lamborghini, the Countach is actually quite discreet. Drive up in front of the opera in a flashy SVJ, and people will turn and stare much more than with a Countach. The Countach is more sophisti­cated, more dignified, and more classic in its design.

And that despite the fact that the original Countach set the bar for sound at Lamborghini back in the 1970s.

Right. When I drove my old Countach somewhere, people would literally be struck silent with shock. They just couldn’t wrap their heads around it. Not to mention the avant-garde look, which still holds true today.

Does the new Countach handle like the original?

Thankfully, no. Though that’s partly due to my personal dilemma with old Italian sports cars: I simply don’t fit in them. But I do fit in the new one. Otherwise, you might be reminded of the old Countach when looking out through the flat windshield. There’s also the sound of the V12. But beyond that I don’t find any similarities.

You picked up the car directly in Sant’Agata Bolognese yourself, didn’t you?

Yes, together with my daughter. I drove it straight home. It was the only Countach LP 800 that was driven straight off the Lamborghini lot. That was quite an event. They actually stood in line and applauded.

What was the drive home like?

Amazing! Of course, there’s no way I can drive slowly in a car like that, so I asked around how strict they are down there in Italy with the speed limit. And they told me I shouldn’t worry about that in a Lamborghini. The police would stop me, but only to look at the car. Besides, the car was new, and you don’t run a new car at full throttle right away. You have to let the car warm up, and you have to get to know the car a bit first, so you push it to 180 km/h or 230 km/h tops, which doesn’t stress the engine at all.

How many times did they pull you over?

Not once.

How about in Austria or Switzerland?

We didn’t go through Switzerland. I can’t stand driving there. We drove through Austria, and I knew I had to pull myself together there as well. So I drove 120 km/h where actually only 100 is allowed. Absolutely no traffic. Three free lanes on the Brenner Autobahn. At some point a Škoda station wagon drove up behind us and began filming us. At first I thought nothing of it, then suddenly (…)

→ Read the whole interview in rampstyle #27 "By the Way".

Michael Köckritz

Michael Köckritz

Editor in Chief
As a journalist, author, artist and media maker, Michael Köckritz succeeds time and again in creating both attention-grabbing and sustainably stimulating impulses in the context of contemporary and future topics as well as lifestyle and luxury worlds. As publisher and editor-in-chief, he has realised a whole series of book and lifestyle magazine formats that have regularly won numerous national and international awards over the years. The car culture magazine ramp, the men's lifestyle magazine rampstyle and the design magazine ramp.design are published internationally and are considered style-setting.
rampstyle #27 By the Way

rampstyle #27 By the Way

Mal ganz nebenbei bemerkt: Rund 30 bis 50 Prozent aller Entdeckungen lassen sich auf Zufälle zurückführen. Ob Klettverschluss, Viagra oder Röntgenstrahlen – man findet etwas, was man so überhaupt nicht gesucht hatte, doch dafür wird man mit anderem belohnt.

Similar articles

Our Bestsellers

  • ramp #64 How About That!
    ramp #64 How About That!
    20,00 EUR
    Surprises open our eyes to new things, which now isn't really a big surprise. The unexpected simply stays in memory longer, sparks curiosity – and prompts action. Essential for adapting to a changing world. The future might just be warming up for progress. It's meant to move forward effectively.
  • rampstyle #31 Isn't That Something?
    rampstyle #31 Isn't That Something?
    20,00 EUR
    Focusing on the essentials, blocking out everything else... If you’re focused, you’ve already mastered one important key skill. In our multimodal world, focus is, unfortunately, a rather limited resource. In particularly focused moments, we forget all about time. But do we run the risk of developing tunnel vision? Does focus lose its power over time? Do we become habituated? Far from it. Unexpected surprises? Bring ‘em on!
  • ramp #63 Happy on the Road
    ramp #63 Happy on the Road
    20,00 EUR
    Happy on the road? You bet. For any respectable car culture magazine, after all, being happy on the road is a mandatory prerequisite. Over time, and with a little bit of luck (which is, after all, a close relative of happiness), these feelings cheerfully blossom into an emotional foundation that ...
  • rampstyle #30 Blue Skies
    rampstyle #30 Blue Skies
    20,00 EUR
    After “All Summer Long” here’s our follow-up issue with the title “Blue Skies”. Of course. Because readers who know a little something about the English singer and songwriter Chris Rea will have already noticed how we’ve come full circle here. The blue sky as a symbol of hopeful optimism about what’s to come.
  • ramp #62 Wild Things
    ramp #62 Wild Things
    20,00 EUR
    Just heading along, the journey itself a wonderfully blank page that presents itself to us with a cheerful unpredictability, as an inspired playing field for trial and error, for curiosity and spontaneity, unexpected surprises and flights of fancy. Wild and untamed. Just like life itself.
  • Director’s Cut: Luxury
    Director’s Cut: Luxury
    125,00 EUR
    Luxury is enticing and exciting, polarizing and provocative, not to mention that it is good for the economy. But the essence of luxury goes far beyond the material. Luxury appeals to our senses, our dreams and our desires. It immediately evokes images that are as precise as they are diverse. Luxury also triggers some pretty clear opinions – both favorable and unfavorable.
  • rampstyle #29 All Summer Long
    rampstyle #29 All Summer Long
    20,00 EUR
    Barcelona in summer. With Alvaro Soler - and a Porsche 911 SC. An approach to the phenomenon and the person Yves Saint Laurent. We spoke with Udo Kier in Palm Springs, and Luc Donckerwolke in his garage. And then there's the cover - and the associated story of House of Spoils.
  • Porsche 911 Everlasting Love Stories
    Porsche 911 Everlasting Love Stories
    99,00 EUR
    Sixty years of the Porsche 911 – sixty years that stand for very personal, highly emotional relationships of love involving this sports car. Stories marked by love, lust and passion. Captured in this high-quality illustrated book.
  • ramp #61 Love Is in the Air
    ramp #61 Love Is in the Air
    20,00 EUR
    Blue skies, the scent of fresh grass, the warmth of the moment – but above all: sunshine. The light of the sun’s rays, scientists say, is the decisive factor at the beginning of the warm season that triggers the merry mix of happiness hormones which energetically drive us headlong into the summer.
  • rampstyle #27 By the Way
    rampstyle #27 By the Way
    20,00 EUR
    Did you know that between thirty and fifty percent of all scientific discoveries are the result of coincidence? Velcro, Viagra, X-rays – sometimes people find things without even looking for them, but they are rewarded with an unexpected alternative.
  • rampstyle #28 Into the Great Wide Open
    rampstyle #28 Into the Great Wide Open
    20,00 EUR
    An exclusive fashion editorial with Tim Bendzko. Unseen pictures by photographer Anouk Masson Krantz. A conversation with star director Guy Ritchie and a somewhat different interview with musician Dan Auerbach. All this and much more awaits you in this issue of rampstyle.
  • Director’s Cut: The Lamborghini Book
    Director’s Cut: The Lamborghini Book
    100,00 EUR
    Author texts, expert interviews and aesthetically pleasing imagery do the brand justice in all aspects and make the book a must-have for all car fans and Lamborghini enthusiasts. Alongside exclusive design sketches, an overview of all series models with full technical specifications completes this extraordinary and ambitious book project.
  • The Lamborghini Book
    The Lamborghini Book
    100,00 EUR
    Author texts, expert interviews and aesthetically pleasing imagery do the brand justice in all aspects and make the book a must-have for all car fans and Lamborghini enthusiasts. An overview of all series models with full technical specifications completes this extraordinary and ambitious book project.
  • ramp #60 Too Cool to Handle.
    ramp #60 Too Cool to Handle.
    20,00 EUR
    A magazine about coolness? Among other things. But one thing at a time. First of all, it’s off to the movies. There’s this businessman from Boston who helps relieve a bank of a substantial amount of money. The insurance companies are on to him, but they can’t prove a thing. That, in a nutshell, is the plot of...
  • ramp #59 Tomorrow Is Yesterday
    ramp #59 Tomorrow Is Yesterday
    18,00 EUR
    “Tomorrow Is Yesterday” was the title of an episode of the television series Star Trek, and although it was the nineteenth episode overall, it was the first to flicker into German living rooms fifty years ago this May. The story revolved around timelines and time travel.
  • rampstyle #26 Good News
    rampstyle #26 Good News
    15,00 EUR
    Two thin ovals far up inside a circle, a curved arc below, sketched on sunny yellow. In a split second, our brain has combined the elements into a smiling face, instantly putting us in a good mood. Wonderful! A smiley like that just feels good.
  • Men’s manual - Best of rampstyle by Michael Köckritz
    Men’s manual - Best of rampstyle by Michael Köckritz
    29,00 EUR
    Existential questions are answered here: How do I build the perfect sandcastle? How do I start a band? Is there a perfect record player? (Spoiler Alert: yes, there is). Men´s manual is a supergroup of sorts: ramp and teNeues throw together their concentrated expertise in lifestyle.
  • ramp #64 How About That!
    ramp #64 How About That!
    20,00 EUR
    Surprises open our eyes to new things, which now isn't really a big surprise. The unexpected simply stays in memory longer, sparks curiosity – and prompts action. Essential for adapting to a changing world. The future might just be warming up for progress. It's meant to move forward effectively.
  • rampstyle #31 Isn't That Something?
    rampstyle #31 Isn't That Something?
    20,00 EUR
    Focusing on the essentials, blocking out everything else... If you’re focused, you’ve already mastered one important key skill. In our multimodal world, focus is, unfortunately, a rather limited resource. In particularly focused moments, we forget all about time. But do we run the risk of developing tunnel vision? Does focus lose its power over time? Do we become habituated? Far from it. Unexpected surprises? Bring ‘em on!
  • ramp #63 Happy on the Road
    ramp #63 Happy on the Road
    20,00 EUR
    Happy on the road? You bet. For any respectable car culture magazine, after all, being happy on the road is a mandatory prerequisite. Over time, and with a little bit of luck (which is, after all, a close relative of happiness), these feelings cheerfully blossom into an emotional foundation that ...
  • rampstyle #30 Blue Skies
    rampstyle #30 Blue Skies
    20,00 EUR
    After “All Summer Long” here’s our follow-up issue with the title “Blue Skies”. Of course. Because readers who know a little something about the English singer and songwriter Chris Rea will have already noticed how we’ve come full circle here. The blue sky as a symbol of hopeful optimism about what’s to come.
  • ramp #62 Wild Things
    ramp #62 Wild Things
    20,00 EUR
    Just heading along, the journey itself a wonderfully blank page that presents itself to us with a cheerful unpredictability, as an inspired playing field for trial and error, for curiosity and spontaneity, unexpected surprises and flights of fancy. Wild and untamed. Just like life itself.
  • Director’s Cut: Luxury
    Director’s Cut: Luxury
    125,00 EUR
    Luxury is enticing and exciting, polarizing and provocative, not to mention that it is good for the economy. But the essence of luxury goes far beyond the material. Luxury appeals to our senses, our dreams and our desires. It immediately evokes images that are as precise as they are diverse. Luxury also triggers some pretty clear opinions – both favorable and unfavorable.
  • rampstyle #29 All Summer Long
    rampstyle #29 All Summer Long
    20,00 EUR
    Barcelona in summer. With Alvaro Soler - and a Porsche 911 SC. An approach to the phenomenon and the person Yves Saint Laurent. We spoke with Udo Kier in Palm Springs, and Luc Donckerwolke in his garage. And then there's the cover - and the associated story of House of Spoils.
  • Porsche 911 Everlasting Love Stories
    Porsche 911 Everlasting Love Stories
    99,00 EUR
    Sixty years of the Porsche 911 – sixty years that stand for very personal, highly emotional relationships of love involving this sports car. Stories marked by love, lust and passion. Captured in this high-quality illustrated book.
  • ramp #61 Love Is in the Air
    ramp #61 Love Is in the Air
    20,00 EUR
    Blue skies, the scent of fresh grass, the warmth of the moment – but above all: sunshine. The light of the sun’s rays, scientists say, is the decisive factor at the beginning of the warm season that triggers the merry mix of happiness hormones which energetically drive us headlong into the summer.
  • rampstyle #27 By the Way
    rampstyle #27 By the Way
    20,00 EUR
    Did you know that between thirty and fifty percent of all scientific discoveries are the result of coincidence? Velcro, Viagra, X-rays – sometimes people find things without even looking for them, but they are rewarded with an unexpected alternative.
  • rampstyle #28 Into the Great Wide Open
    rampstyle #28 Into the Great Wide Open
    20,00 EUR
    An exclusive fashion editorial with Tim Bendzko. Unseen pictures by photographer Anouk Masson Krantz. A conversation with star director Guy Ritchie and a somewhat different interview with musician Dan Auerbach. All this and much more awaits you in this issue of rampstyle.
  • Director’s Cut: The Lamborghini Book
    Director’s Cut: The Lamborghini Book
    100,00 EUR
    Author texts, expert interviews and aesthetically pleasing imagery do the brand justice in all aspects and make the book a must-have for all car fans and Lamborghini enthusiasts. Alongside exclusive design sketches, an overview of all series models with full technical specifications completes this extraordinary and ambitious book project.
  • The Lamborghini Book
    The Lamborghini Book
    100,00 EUR
    Author texts, expert interviews and aesthetically pleasing imagery do the brand justice in all aspects and make the book a must-have for all car fans and Lamborghini enthusiasts. An overview of all series models with full technical specifications completes this extraordinary and ambitious book project.
  • ramp #60 Too Cool to Handle.
    ramp #60 Too Cool to Handle.
    20,00 EUR
    A magazine about coolness? Among other things. But one thing at a time. First of all, it’s off to the movies. There’s this businessman from Boston who helps relieve a bank of a substantial amount of money. The insurance companies are on to him, but they can’t prove a thing. That, in a nutshell, is the plot of...
  • ramp #59 Tomorrow Is Yesterday
    ramp #59 Tomorrow Is Yesterday
    18,00 EUR
    “Tomorrow Is Yesterday” was the title of an episode of the television series Star Trek, and although it was the nineteenth episode overall, it was the first to flicker into German living rooms fifty years ago this May. The story revolved around timelines and time travel.
  • rampstyle #26 Good News
    rampstyle #26 Good News
    15,00 EUR
    Two thin ovals far up inside a circle, a curved arc below, sketched on sunny yellow. In a split second, our brain has combined the elements into a smiling face, instantly putting us in a good mood. Wonderful! A smiley like that just feels good.
  • Men’s manual - Best of rampstyle by Michael Köckritz
    Men’s manual - Best of rampstyle by Michael Köckritz
    29,00 EUR
    Existential questions are answered here: How do I build the perfect sandcastle? How do I start a band? Is there a perfect record player? (Spoiler Alert: yes, there is). Men´s manual is a supergroup of sorts: ramp and teNeues throw together their concentrated expertise in lifestyle.